Friday, 20th of October 2017

Friday, 20th of October 2017

Dedicated by the Society of Colonial Wars on May 7, 1954, this tablet commemorates the William Trent House, built 1716-1719 near the falls of the Delaware River by William Trent, a wealthy merchant and ship-owner, and also Chief Justice of New Jersey 1723-1724. Trent also laid out the settlement he named “Trent’s Town”, later to become New Jersey's capital.

The house was leased in 1742 to the first Governor of New Jersey, Lewis Morris. During the Revolution, it was occupied by Hessian forces and played a prominent role in several battles fought during December 1776. Later, Dr. William Bryant was evicted for his Tory sympathies. Colonel John Cox, Assistant Quartermaster General of the Continental Army, acquired the property in 1778, and turned the grounds into a supply depot for Washington's army.

TrentHouse

 

Chief Justice of New Jersey 1723-1724
FROM WHOM TRENTON DERIVED ITS NAME
WAS HIS HOME UNTIL HIS DEATH IN 1724

Other owners or occupants of the House were

LEWIS MORRIS COL. JOHN COX
First Governor of New Jersey Assistant Quartermaster General
as a separate Province of the Continental Army
Resident 1742-1746 Owner 1778-1792, Resident 1778-1790

PHILEMON DICKERSON RODMAN McCAMLEY PRICE
Governor of New Jersey 1836-1837 Governor of New Jersey 1854-1857
Owner 1835-1838 Resident 1854-1859

THIS TABLET ERECTED BY THE SOCIETY OF COLONIAL WARS
IN THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY
MCMLIV

 

Trent House returned to prominence in 1835 when Philemon Dickerson purchased it. As Governor, he used it as his official residence. In 1854, it became the home of Governor Rodman McCamley Price. The last private owner of the property, Edward A. Stokes, donated the building to the City of Trenton in 1929 with the stipulations that it be returned to its appearance during the William Trent era and that it be used as a library, art gallery or museum.