Monday, 21st of August 2017

Monday, 21st of August 2017

TheBlackWatch

The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New Jersey on July 6, 1997 joined with the Black Watch Council of Ticonderoga and the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York to dedicate a monument to The Black Watch, a Scottish regiment which suffered heavy casualties during the Battle of Carillon. The monument is located along the road into Fort Ticonderoga and consists of a rectangular tablet mounted on a small stone that sits in front of a cylindrical cairn marked with a St. Andrew’s cross of stone. As a readable image of the tablet is contained in the New York Society section of this book, a transcription is not included here.

The Battle of Carillon, the bloodiest of the French and Indian War, was fought on July 8, 1758 near Fort Carillon (now Fort Ticonderoga) on the shore of Lake Champlain. A French army of about 3,500 men under General Montcalm decisively defeated a British force more than three times its size. The British, under the command of General James Abercromby, made several fatal mistakes, including the frontal assault on an entrenched French position without the use of field artillery. Among those who fought that day were soldiers of the Scottish 42nd Regiment of Foot, also known as the The Black Watch. Of the thousand men in the unit, 287 were wounded and 205 died in the Battle of Carillon.